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New study finds neuroimaging predicts course of substance addiction treatment

New study finds neuroimaging predicts course of substance addiction treatment
15th October 2012

New research has found that neuroimaging can help to predict the course of substance addiction treatment.

According to a study conducted by researchers at Indiana University Bloomington, preliminary evidence has been uncovered showing that by measuring brain activity through the use of neuroimaging, experts are able to predict who is likely to have an easier time getting off drugs and alcohol, as well as those who will need extra help.

Joshua Brown, assistant professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences at Indiana University Bloomington, part of the College of Arts and Sciences, said: "We can also see how brain activity changes as people recover from their addictions."

It is believed that one of the potential causes for relapse is deficient self-regulatory control over behavior and decision-making.

Dr Paul Kurdyak, chief of general and health systems psychiatry at Canada's Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, recently claimed that that the majority of people who are affected by addiction are not receiving treatment, even if it is available.

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