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Breakthrough 'may lead to new Huntington's treatments'

Breakthrough 'may lead to new Huntington's treatments'
17th March 2011

A research breakthrough in protein folding could be key in the development of new treatments for debilitating diseases such as Huntington's and Alzheimer's, scientists have said.

The process is thought to play a role in the development of diseases such as Huntington's and Alzheimer's, with misfolding thought to be key.

However, until now scientists have not been able to glimpse the folding of vital proteins, as the process occurs deep inside molecular chambers.

Stanford University researchers have now witnessed the process, in a breakthrough they believe could pave the way to new therapies for such conditions.

Professor Judith Frydman, who led the study, said: "The mechanism of folding we saw in the chaperonin is very different from what we expected and from what has been seen in bacteria.

"It was really surprising, and we are still amazed that it worked."

Meanwhile, research conducted at Johnson & Johnson found that the experimental drug Bapineuzumab was able to attack free floating bits of beta amyloid protein, believed to be pivotal in Alzheimer’s disease.

Find out how Barchester works to create safe and understanding environments for those living with Huntington's Disease