Chronic kidney disease 'changes composition of intestinal bacterial microbes '

Chronic kidney disease 'changes composition of intestinal bacterial microbes '

New research by scientists in the US has found chronic kidney disease changes the composition of intestinal bacterial microbes.

A study conducted by specialists at the University of California, Irvine (UCI) School of Medicine's Division of Nephrology & Hypertension found that the alteration of the gut microbial population could contribute to the production of uremic toxins, systemic and local inflammation.

Study leader Dr Nostratola Vaziri of the UCI School of Medicine's Division of Nephrology & Hypertension explained nitrogen-rich waste products - particularly urea and uric acid - gather in the body fluids of patients with renal failure.

It may therefore be necessary to provide longer, more frequent dialysis treatments for individuals who are affected by chronic kidney disease, Dr Vaziri said.

A review in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology recently claimed it is becoming easier for kidney disease patients to use home hemodialysis systems.

Around two million people worldwide are believed to be receiving a form of dialysis treatment.

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