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Two specific genes 'increase predisposition to lung cancer in smokers'

Two specific genes 'increase predisposition to lung cancer in smokers'
18th August 2011

A combination of two genes can heighten the risk of lung cancer, particularly in light smokers, research shows, potentially making carriers more likely to be dependent on home care.

Research published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute found that the cancer risk from two specific genes was highest in smokers who consume fewer than 20 cigarettes per day.

In addition, those who possess the genes have a higher risk of smoking more cigarettes and becoming more dependent on nicotine.

Dr Rachel Tyndale, of the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, said: "We found that the nicotine metabolic gene appears to have a larger influence on how many cigarettes people smoke each day, while the nicotinic gene cluster has a larger impact on the risk of lung cancer."

In other news, caffeine cuts the risk of skin cancer, according to new research at the Rutgers University.

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