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Psychosocial interventions 'improve behaviour and mood in people with dementia'

Psychosocial interventions 'improve behaviour and mood in people with dementia'
1st November 2012

Older adults who are affected by dementia may be able to benefit from psychosocial interactions, according to the results of a new study.

Research conducted in London and published in the British Journal of Psychiatry stated that it remains unclear how to maximise their effectiveness or acceptability in residential settings.

"The synthesis of 39 qualitative papers revealed that beneficial psychosocial interventions met the needs of people with dementia to connect with others, make a meaningful contribution and reminisce," it was noted by the study, which added that the findings from the research will help to inform the development and evaluation of psychosocial interventions in care homes, as well as to support their widespread implementation in clinical settings.

Research was made possible through funding provided as part of a five-year National Institute for Health Research programme grant.

A study funded by the Alzheimer's Society and led by King's College London recently found that dementia could be tackled through the use of everyday drugs.

Find out about dementia care and support services at Barchester care homes.