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People in poor neighbourhoods 'more likely to suffer cognitive and mobility problems'

People in poor neighbourhoods 'more likely to suffer cognitive and mobility problems'
14th April 2008

New research suggests that neighbourhood deprivation can have an affect on the physical and mental stability of elderly adults.

A team from the Peninsula Medical School in south-west England investigated some 7,000 individuals aged over 52 and found that those living in the most derived areas were likely to have poorer cognitive function - despite income or education, reports Medical News Today.

A second study of more than 4,100 participants found that over a two-year period 13.6 per cent of people living in deprived areas developed mobility problems, compared with four per cent of those living in lesser deprived areas.

Dr Iain Lang, who led the research, told the news provider: "Clearly the type of neighbourhood you live in has an important effect on your health in later life. This underlines how important it is for local and central government to provide adequate levels of health and social care where they are most needed - in our poorest communities."

This follows news from Uppsala University in Sweden that developing diabetes in middle age may lead to an increased risk of Alzheimer's.

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