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Oxygen during stroke can 'reduce brain tissue damage'

Oxygen during stroke can 'reduce brain tissue damage'
20th October 2009

In order to restrict brain tissue damage during a stroke, the use of supplemental oxygen may be key, according to a new report.

Savita Khanna, the assistant professor of surgery at Ohio State University and a principal investigator of the research, explained that the use of supplemental oxygen after blood flow is restored to the brain causes more harm than good due to it unleashing free radicals.

Resulting tissue damage was found to be worse than stroke-affected tissue that received no treatment at all, though tissue addressed during the stroke fared much better.

Ms Khanna continued: "Ultimately, the supplemental oxygen after blood flow is restored is more than the tissue can handle and is more than it needs. Why add oxygen on top of tissue that's already oxygenated? Supplemental oxygen during the blockage, on the other hand, is highly protective."

The Stroke Association claims that of all people who are hit by a stroke, around a third are likely to die within the first ten days and another third are likely to be left disabled and in need of rehabilitation.

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