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NHS puts people with dementia at risk by not providing correct care

NHS puts people with dementia at risk by not providing correct care
12th March 2013

The NHS is playing "Russian roulette" with the health of people diagnosed with dementia, the Care Quality Commission (CQC) has claimed.

The non-departmental public body says those who have the cognitive brain disorder are twice as likely die in hospital than those without it.

This is because staff often fail to realise that the patient has dementia and places them on a normal ward rather than one in which they would receive specialist care.

According to the CQC's latest Care Update report, one in three people with dementia (29 per cent) were listed as being regular first patients when first admitted to hospital.

Chris Day, the report's author, said these people often then receive a lower standard of care because the hospital does not cater its services around the needs of the patient.

Jeremy Hughes, chief executive of the Alzheimer’s Society, added: "Hospitals are supposed to be places of recovery but people with dementia are going in too often, staying too long and dying in a hospital bed much more than those with any other condition."

Find out about dementia care and support services at Barchester care homes.