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New research could prove critical in monitoring Huntington's Disease

New research could prove critical in monitoring Huntington's Disease
4th October 2011

A transcriptional biomarker has been found that could prove critical in monitoring Huntington's Disease and evaluating the success of treatments in patients.

Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital claim that a blood test could be employed to follow the activity of Huntington's Disease, as well as the response in patients to different treatments.

"[This] test would be critical for making clinical trials more efficient. We are excited about the potential of our discovery," commented Clemens Scherzer, assistant professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School.

"The next challenge will be to develop this prototype biomarker into a test that is useful in drug trials," he continued.

Huntington's Disease is a hereditary disorder that affects the central nervous system and develops in adulthood.

Formerly known as Huntington's chorea, the disease presents itself in the form of uncontrollable muscular movements, stumbling and clumsiness, lack of concentration, short-term memory lapses, depression and changes of mood.

Find out how Barchester works to create safe and understanding environments for those living with Huntington's Disease