You are here

Link between 'ability to self-administer and memory loss' in stroke survivors

Link between 'ability to self-administer and memory loss' in stroke survivors
18th August 2014

There could be a link between those who administer their own medication and the rate of memory loss in individuals who have experienced a stroke.

Researchers from Kessler looked at 24 patients who had had a stroke and 17 controls. It became apparent the former group had over-estimated their ability to self-administer their treatment in comparison to the latter. In addition, this habit had a strong correlation with verbal memory deficit. 

Dr A M Barrett commented that while some stroke survivors are intelligent, they can still have difficulty with thinking, which can bring about errors in working out how much of their medication to take.

It was also highlighted how ascertaining whether or not these individuals struggle with self-administering could be useful in relation to working out what memory deficits they have. In turn, this could help them to feel less excluded from their community and assist in rehabilitation. 

However, the authors stated larger studies need to be conducted to find out why over and under-estimation takes place among those who have experienced a stroke. 

Find the nearest Barchester care home