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Dysfunctional nervous system 'contributes to heart failure'

Dysfunctional nervous system 'contributes to heart failure'
3rd February 2010

A dysfunctional parasympathetic nervous system contributes to a heart failure, new research has shown.

Researchers from the Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry have developed a test method that specifically targets chemical messenger acetylcholine in mice, finding that over time their hearts decreased their ability to pump blood.

This is similar to what occurs during human heart failure.

Researchers hope that the findings could be used to improve methods for those being treated for heart failure, such as those receiving close care or assisted living.

Commenting on the findings, professor Marco Prado of the school's departments of physiology and pharmacology said: "One striking finding in this study is that heart dysfunction in these mice could be corrected by treating the animals with an existing drug which increases acetylcholine levels.

"Although it requires further study, this could provide a novel opportunity for treating failing hearts."

Recent research published in the New England Journal of Medicine indicated that fitting a pacemaker can delay the progression of heart failure.

Dysfunctional nervous system 'contributes to heart failure'

A certain state of the nervous system can contribute to heart failure, according to new research.

A dysfunctional parasympathetic nervous system contributes to a heart failure, new research has shown.

Researchers from the Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry have developed a test method that specifically targets chemical messenger acetylcholine in mice, finding that over time their hearts decreased their ability to pump blood.

This is similar to what occurs during human heart failure.

Researchers hope that the findings could be used to improve methods for those being treated for heart failure, such as those receiving close care or assisted living.

Commenting on the findings, professor Marco Prado of the school's departments of physiology and pharmacology said: "One striking finding in this study is that heart dysfunction in these mice could be corrected by treating the animals with an existing drug which increases acetylcholine levels.

"Although it requires further study, this could provide a novel opportunity for treating failing hearts."

Recent research published in the New England Journal of Medicine indicated that fitting a pacemaker can delay the progression of heart failure.

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