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Drug shows improvements in patients after heart attack or stroke

Drug shows improvements in patients after heart attack or stroke
1st September 2009

A new Jupiter study has found that a certain drug is able to reduce cardiovascular events by up to 50 per cent when compared to placebos.

Crestor, clinically known as rosuvastatin, was tested on 5,695 patients aged 70 or older who had experienced a number of ailments including stroke, heart attack and other related issues.

It was discovered that the risk of heart attack was reduced by 45 per cent while the combined risk of cardiovascular death, heart attack and stroke by 40 per cent.

Michael Cressman, AstraZeneca's Director of Clinical Research for Crestor, said of the results: "This analysis is important because it provides physicians with further evidence that Crestor can significantly reduce the risk of major CV events in elderly patients at higher risk of cardiovascular disease."

Recently, it was also discovered by a New England Journal of Medicine study that a new drug, dabigatran, is 34 per cent more effective than warfarin in reducing the risk of stroke and blood clots.

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