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Different lifespans for Alzheimer's patients with diabetes - study

Different lifespans for Alzheimer's patients with diabetes - study
4th November 2008

People with Alzheimer's disease who also have diabetes or high blood pressure may not live as long as Alzheimer's patients who do not have such conditions, new US research suggests.

In a study of 323 people, scientists found that Alzheimer's patients with diabetes were twice as likely to die sooner than those who were not diabetic, according to the findings published in the Neurology journal.

People living with Alzheimer's disease and high blood pressure were found to be two-and-a-half times more likely to die sooner than those with normal blood pressure.

"Studies show that the average lifespan of a person diagnosed with Alzheimer's can be anywhere from three to nine years," commented study author Yaakov Stern.

He added that the research appeared to have pinpointed two factors which may "drastically affect" length of survival.

UK charity the Alzheimer's Society has said that the identification of interactions between dementia and other diseases may be "highly beneficial" as it could lead to the discovery of ways in which people can make necessary changes in order to "reduce risk and improve lives".

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