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Antidepressants do not increase suicide risk in youths, study finds

Antidepressants do not increase suicide risk in youths, study finds
7th February 2012

It has been confirmed that antidepressants do not increase the risk of suicide in youths, according to a study at the University of Chicago.

Researchers found that fluoxetine does not increase suicidality in children when measured against a placebo treatment.

In 2004 the US government issued a "black box warning" over the treatment after it had been reported that young patients were experiencing an increase in suicidal thoughts and actions.

However, analysis of 41 clinical trials and more than 9,000 patients has found this is not the case. Two different anti-depressant drugs were also identified as actually reducing suicidal symptoms in adult and geriatric patients.

It is hoped that the study will reassure clinicians prescribing antidepressants.

In 2006 levels of suicide in the US decreased as the number of fluoxetine prescriptions increased.

Researchers at the University of California have hypothesised that fluoxetine might have saved 33,600 lives since its introduction in 1988.

Read about support and personalised care at Barchester care homes for anyone with mental health concerns.