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Alzheimer's drug could be tested on humans within two years

Alzheimer's drug could be tested on humans within two years
25th April 2008

A new Alzheimer's drug could be tested on humans within the next two years.

Researchers from the Max Plank Institute in Dresden, Germany have stated that the medication proved successful when tested on mice and fruit flies which were genetically engineered to have the condition - reducing brain alteration associated with Alzheimer's by up to 50 per cent.

The drug works by targeting the beta-secretase enzyme which is involved in the production of beta-amyloid - a plaque which kills off brain cells.

"The approach has the potential to be used in the design of more effective beta-secretase inhibitors for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease," states lead researcher Professor Kai Simmons.

If further tests are successful, the medication could be available to patients in between five and ten years.

This follows news that that drug manufacturer Eisai has taken the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence to the court of appeal over its decision to deny people with early Alzheimer's access to the drug aricept.

A verdict in expected sometime in May.

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