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Long Term Care

Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
5th September 2007
New research has revealed that damage to vision caused by a stroke can be reversed by the body reorganising the brain. In a study of a 51-year-old man six months after he had suffered a stroke, scientists found that an area of his brain that had stopped receiving signals from the eyes due to the stroke was responding to signals formerly managed by adjacent brain areas. Dr Shimon Ullman, of the...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
5th September 2007
Studying highly-detailed images of fruit flies is giving scientists insights into human brain function. Using an imaging technique called optical projection tomography, scientists from the Medical Research Council have generated 3D images of the inside of a fruit fly for the first time. Lead researcher Dr Mary O'Connell said that her team had used the images to build upon existing knowledge about...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
5th September 2007
Fatty deposits in the hearts of pre-diabetic people can be detected long before symptoms appear using a simple imaging technique developed by US researchers. The technique captures the signal from a beating heart as a patient resides in an ordinary magnet used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning. Previous studies had shown that fat builds up in the hearts of people with heart failure or...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
4th September 2007
Cutting salt content to make foods healthier does not increase the risk of spoilage by bacteria, scientists said today. Scientists from the University of Limerick in Ireland assessed safety levels of reduced salt foods by studying the behaviour of different strains of food spoilage bacteria. The link between high salt consumption and heart disease has led to food manufacturers lowering salt...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
4th September 2007
Using deodorants might increase a woman's chance of developing breast cancer, British scientists have revealed. Aluminium, which is used as an antiperspirant in most deodorants, was found in breast tissue taken from breast cancer patients who had undergone mastectomies. Researchers found "significantly higher" levels of aluminium in the underarm region of the breast where antiperspirants are...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
4th September 2007
Smokers have a higher chance of developing Alzheimer's disease or dementia, according to a new study. The seven-year study of nearly 7,000 people age 55 and older found that current smokers were 50 percent more likely to develop dementia than people who had never smoked or had done so in the past. Study author Dr Monique Breteler said: "Smoking increases the risk of cerebrovascular disease, which...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
3rd September 2007
Lung cancer patients could benefit from a new drug which predicts which chemotherapy drugs will work. A team from the University of Cincinnati has identified a molecular pathway called the retinoblastoma (RB) tumour suppressor that controls cell multiplication. Research has shown that the RB pathway is either completely dormant or altered in most human cancers. Scientists are beginning to use its...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
3rd September 2007
A drug costing just 50p per day could save thousands of British lives, scientists said today. Diabetic patients who were put on Coversyl Plus were 18 per cent less likely to die from heart-related illnesses, according to an international study. Moreover, the drug has almost no negative side-effects. Over 11,000 people with Type 2 diabetes from 20 countries, including Britain, took part in the...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
3rd September 2007
Viruses found in a picture-perfect Cambridge river could generate the next wave of antibiotics, scientists said today. Experts speaking at the Society for General Microbiology's 161st Meeting at the University of Edinburgh said that infections could be treated using viruses which target specific bacteria. These viruses, which are called phages, do not disturb the normal microbial balance in the...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
31st August 2007
New details about the mechanism by which cancer cells multiply have been revealed by Japanese researchers. Scientists from the University of Yamanashi have identified a protein which plays a crucial role in the aggregation of platelets induced by cancer. Cancer cells release chemicals that enabling them to bind to the inside of blood vessels and thus evade the immune system. One of these...

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