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Long Term Care

Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
14th September 2007
Honey could be used to ward off memory decline, a new study has shown. According to the New Scientist magazine, rats fed on honey were less anxious and had better memories than another group of rodents with a sucrose diet. Lynne Chepulis and Nicola Starkey of the University of Waikato in Hamilton, New Zealand found that the honey-fed rats spent almost twice as much time in the open areas of an...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
14th September 2007
A report by the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) has set new standards for the diagnosis, management and prevention of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Updates include new staging guidelines for deciding the severity of COPD and recommendations for coordinating healthcare teams. Lead author Dr Klaus Rabe said the report was "an absolutely up-to-date...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
13th September 2007
Loneliness expresses itself in our genes, according to new research. US researchers have discovered that social isolation is linked to alterations in the activity of genes involved in the immune system. Previous studies had shown that loneliness is linked to an increased risk of heart disease, viral infections and cancer, but now scientists are beginning to unpick the phenomenon at the molecular...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
13th September 2007
Scientists have identified a type of cancer stem cell (CSC) that causes metastasis of a fatal human pancreatic cancer. CSCs are thought to be a small population of tumour cells that, like normal stem cells, are self-replicating and generate differentiated cells. The cancer in question, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, is the fourth leading cause of cancer death and is relatively incurable due to its...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
13th September 2007
Patients with metabolic syndrome have a greater risk of developing kidney stones, according to scientists at the University of Texas (UT). The link is due to the fact that people with the syndrome, which puts them at risk of for heart disease, stroke and diabetes, often excrete highly acidic urine. Previous research had found that people who were overweight or suffered from diabetes had highly...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
12th September 2007
US research has revealed that protein-generating material found in all cells may have a key role in cancer. A study published in the September issue of the journal Cancer Cell has found that a type of ribonucleic acid (RNA) can contribute to cancer development. The researchers believe that ultraconserved noncoding RNAs (UCRs) could serve as genetic markers for cancer susceptibility and are...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
12th September 2007
A compound found in tangerine peel could be used to zap cancer cells, according to a UK study. Salvestrol Q40 is produced by plants to repel insects and fungi. A team from the Leicester School of Pharmacy found the chemical was 20 times more toxic to cancer cells than their healthy counterparts. Salvestrol was found in other fruit and vegetables, including broccoli and brussels sprouts. However,...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
11th September 2007
Regular doses of vitamin D can extend life expectancy, according to new research. Dubbed the 'sunshine vitamin' because it is produced following solar exposure, vitamin D consumption has long been associated with a lower risk of diabetes, heart disease and cancer. Now, researchers think the vitamin might block cancer cells from spreading, improve the functioning of blood cells or boost the immune...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
11th September 2007
More than five million Britons are unaware they have high blood pressure, it has been revealed. This means 8,000 deaths from strokes and 13,000 from heart attacks are avoidable, the Blood Pressure Association (BDA) said. The dire warning came as the charity launched Know your Numbers! Week, the nation's biggest ever blood pressure testing initiative. Graham MacGregor, professor of cardiovascular...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
11th September 2007
Yellow and dark leafy vegetables may lower the risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). A report in the September issue of Archives of Ophthalmology found that two pigments found in the plants, lutein and zeaxanthin, can filter out the short-wavelength light known to cause deterioration of the area at the back of the retina. The Age-Related Eye Disease Study Research Group examined 4,519...

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