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Long Term Care

Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
8th November 2007
US researchers are hoping that they have made a breakthrough in type 1 diabetes. In an animal study, scientists found that single gene, 12/15-lipoxygenase (12/15-LO) increased the likelihood of developing type 1 diabetes by 97 per cent. Those with the gene were also more likely to have lower glucose intolerance, one of the indicators for a pre-diabetes condition. Dr Jerry Nadler, chief of the UVa...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
8th November 2007
Two new studies have shown that exercise promotes the growth of muscle cells and blood vessels in people with heart failure. Chronic heart failure occurs when the heart is too weak to pump blood to other organs. Physical activity is uncomfortable for sufferers. However, its benefits seem clear. In a six-month study, exercise was found to increase the number of progenitor cells, which divide into...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
7th November 2007
New research has determined that fat cells help the pancreas to secrete insulin. Insulin resistance is associated with type 2 diabetes, so it is hoped that the discovery will lead to new treatment avenues. In an animal study, scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis found that fat cells release a protein that causes pancreatic beta cells to increase their production of...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
7th November 2007
New research suggests that fasting can improve the health of the heart. The study compared Mormons, who fast for one day each month as part of their faith, to a control group. There was a five per cent difference in rates of coronary artery disease (CAD) for the two groups, with 61 per cent of Mormons affected compared to 66 per cent of the controls. The researchers then executed a follow-up...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
7th November 2007
Copper can cause damage to a molecule that wards against Alzheimer's disease, new research suggests. The build-up of amyloid beta in the brain is closely associated with the development of the neurological disorder. Now a study from the University of Rochester Medical Center has indicated that copper damages a protein that removes amyloid beta from the brain. Lead author Dr Rashid Deane said more...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
6th November 2007
It is better to be towards the lighter end of your healthy body mass index (BMI) range in terms of cancer risk, experts have advised. A new report published by the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) found that the higher an individual's body fat, the greater their risk of developing cancer. Therefore, its key recommendation was to keep BMI within the 20 to 25 range. The report was based on the 7,...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
6th November 2007
Scientists have discovered a risk factor for heart disease that can be identified as early as the age of seven. The study focused on 'body mass index (BMI) rebound age', which refers to the age at which the index hits its lowest point. This usually occurs between the ages of four and seven. BMI increases steadily through late childhood, adolescence and adulthood. Researchers studied BMI rebound...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
6th November 2007
Two food molecules found in vegetables and bran could help protect against damage to DNA caused by radiation, according to new research. Inositol and inositol hexaphosphate (IP6), both antioxidants, were found to protect human cancer cells, raising the possibility that they could help reduce the damage caused by radiation therapy. Cells irreparably damaged by radiation usually experience a...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
5th November 2007
The findings of a new European study suggest that stress can increase the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. Scientists working in Germany, Portugal and the UK determined that stress increases the production of amyloid beta peptide, the molecule associated with the build-up of plaque scientists believe causes the neurological disease. They found that ingesting glucocorticoids (GC), which are...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
5th November 2007
West Oak care home is celebrating recognition for its gardening efforts as part of the Barchester in Bloom scheme. Sara Gallagher, manager of the home, and Esme Crozier, a resident, went to collect a plaque at a ceremony in Painshill Park in Cobham, Surrey. The prize, recognising the home's achievement as finalists in the Best Sensory Garden category, was presented by Charlie Dimmock of...

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