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Long Term Care

Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
12th November 2007
Around 25 per cent of men admitted to hospital with acute urinary retention (AUR) die within a year, a new study has determined. A study published in the British Medical Journal concludes that mortality for men over 45 hospitalised for AUR is two to three times higher than for the general male population. AUR often results from an increase in the size of the prostate gland among middle-aged and...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
9th November 2007
The increased risk of cervical cancer associated with the contraceptive pill disappears ten years after discontinuing use, according to new research. Led by Dr Jane Green from the Cancer Epidemiology Unit at the University of Oxford, the scientists examined 24 studies from around the world and found that, in line with previous research, the longer a woman has been taking contraceptives, the...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
9th November 2007
A new study has suggested that vitamin D slows down the ageing process. Research for the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, involving academics from King's College London, found that women with higher levels of vitamin D were more likely to have longer strands of DNA. These strands, called telomeres, shorten every time cells reproduce themselves, acting as a biological ageing 'clock'. Senior...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
8th November 2007
US researchers are hoping that they have made a breakthrough in type 1 diabetes. In an animal study, scientists found that single gene, 12/15-lipoxygenase (12/15-LO) increased the likelihood of developing type 1 diabetes by 97 per cent. Those with the gene were also more likely to have lower glucose intolerance, one of the indicators for a pre-diabetes condition. Dr Jerry Nadler, chief of the UVa...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
8th November 2007
Two new studies have shown that exercise promotes the growth of muscle cells and blood vessels in people with heart failure. Chronic heart failure occurs when the heart is too weak to pump blood to other organs. Physical activity is uncomfortable for sufferers. However, its benefits seem clear. In a six-month study, exercise was found to increase the number of progenitor cells, which divide into...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
8th November 2007
Scientists have developed a new technique to monitor the area of the brain that regulates hunger. Using magnetic resonance imaging on mice, scientists detected increased neuron activity when the mouse was hungry, which made the scan 'light up'. The researchers were able to observe how the neurons reacted to different stimuli. It is hoped the study will lead to a better understanding of obesity....
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
7th November 2007
New research has determined that fat cells help the pancreas to secrete insulin. Insulin resistance is associated with type 2 diabetes, so it is hoped that the discovery will lead to new treatment avenues. In an animal study, scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis found that fat cells release a protein that causes pancreatic beta cells to increase their production of...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
7th November 2007
New research suggests that fasting can improve the health of the heart. The study compared Mormons, who fast for one day each month as part of their faith, to a control group. There was a five per cent difference in rates of coronary artery disease (CAD) for the two groups, with 61 per cent of Mormons affected compared to 66 per cent of the controls. The researchers then executed a follow-up...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
7th November 2007
Copper can cause damage to a molecule that wards against Alzheimer's disease, new research suggests. The build-up of amyloid beta in the brain is closely associated with the development of the neurological disorder. Now a study from the University of Rochester Medical Center has indicated that copper damages a protein that removes amyloid beta from the brain. Lead author Dr Rashid Deane said more...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
6th November 2007
Two food molecules found in vegetables and bran could help protect against damage to DNA caused by radiation, according to new research. Inositol and inositol hexaphosphate (IP6), both antioxidants, were found to protect human cancer cells, raising the possibility that they could help reduce the damage caused by radiation therapy. Cells irreparably damaged by radiation usually experience a...

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