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Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
23rd November 2007
New research has demonstrated that an antidepressant drug could potentially increase life expectancy. The drug, called mianserin, works by tricking the brain into believing it is starving. Previous studies have shown that reducing the amount animals eat can extend their lives by 30 per cent and now this could be possible for humans without the pain of actually going hungry. Professor Linda Buck...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
22nd November 2007
A team of scientists from Bristol University are investigating the cause of blood vessel leaks which occur in Alzheimer's sufferers. They hope that this research will enable them to pinpoint why some people suffer from the disease and others don't. In Alzheimer's disease an abnormal protein, amyloid, builds up in the walls of blood vessels and makes them leaky. This can potentially damage...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
22nd November 2007
A new study suggests that eating fish may be the solution to preventing "senior moments" such as losing your keys and glasses. Dr A David Smith of Oxford University found that the more regularly elderly men and women eat fish the better they score on memory, visual conception, spatial motor skills and verbal fluency tests. Over 2,000 Norwegians, aged over 70, were assessed by Dr Smith and his...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
22nd November 2007
A 94 year-old widow suffering from dementia has won a high court battle with the NHS over payment of her nursing fees.Hilda Atkinson, a resident at Consort Village Care Centre in Plymouth, fought a legal battle with the support of her family against the authorities to force them to recognise that she required the free 24-hour nursing care available on the NHS.This was opposed to the "social care...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
21st November 2007
A new cancer treatment works against affected cells by over-activating them, researchers have discovered. Scientists at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Centre have discovered the new bortezomib drug is able to push melanoma tumour cells into over-drive until they self destruct. Bortezomib causes the c-MYC oncogene to overproduce a cell death promoter called NOXA. The oncogenes...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
21st November 2007
New research has shown that a commonly-used heart device does not worsen the quality of a patient's life. Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) sense when the heart is beating too fast or erratically and provide a potentially life saving shock to correct it. Over a 36-month study there were no detectable differences in quality of life between patients treated with ICDs and those...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
21st November 2007
A recent study has shown that computer-based training programmes can rejuvenate elderly people's memories by up to ten years. Research carried out by the Mayo Clinic and the University of Southern California showed that participants who used Brain Fitness training software rather than a conventional educational programme showed a greater mental improvement. After using US company Posit Science's...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
20th November 2007
The first gene-based therapy for Parkinson's disease has proven effective after initial brain scans of patients. In the on-going trials, patients' brains were injected with a harmless, genetically modified virus to dampen down the overactive nerve cells which interfere with Parkinson's sufferers' movement control. Patients showed signs of progress one month after treatment, while three to six...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
20th November 2007
Scientists have discovered how certain tumours are missed by the body's natural defences, according to research published this week. The findings are based on the examinations of immune systems in healthy individuals. The group, based at King's College London, believe their discoveries could lead to better treatments for cancers and tumours. The research revealed that regulatory T-cells working...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
20th November 2007
A new strategy for dealing with rheumatoid arthritis has been developed by researchers from RTI International University, North Carolina. According to their report, combining a well-known synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs with one of six biologic medications often works best to reduce the joint swelling and tenderness associated with the condition. Dr Carolyn Clancy, director of the...

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