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Healthcare news (industry news)

Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
28th September 2007
All alcohol influences the risk of developing the cancer, with the quantity consumed the important factor, rather than the type of beverage. One of the largest studies of alcohol and breast cancer risk ever undertaken has concluded that whether you drink wine, beer or spirits is irrelevant. Instead, what matters is total alcohol intake. The research reveals that women who drink between one and...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
27th September 2007
Stress levels affect breast cancer recurrence, new research has revealed. Scientists from the University of Rochester Medical Center and Stanford University School of Medicine found that women who experienced physical or sexual abuse or life-threatening situations see metastatic tumours return after around 2.5 years. For women who do not experience such stressful events, cancer recurred at about...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
27th September 2007
Treatment for diabetes can be as inconvenient and discomfiting as experiencing complications brought about by the illness, according to new US research. A typical diabetes patient has a daily regimen of two or three different pills to control blood sugar levels, one or two to lower cholesterol, two or more to reduce blood pressure, a daily aspirin to prevent blood clots, in addition to monitoring...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
26th September 2007
A Spanish study has uncovered ignorance about cancer among its elderly, which could have global implications. In the survey of 557 people aged over 65, some 66 per cent did not realise the risk of cancer increased with age. Worryingly, 61.2 per cent of the respondents failed to identify being overweight as a risk factor for cancer and just 45.8 per cent knew about the impact of diet. However,...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
25th September 2007
Researchers have identified a marker which should help to detect Alzheimer's disease earlier, according to a study in the October issue of Radiology. While participants performed a face-name associative memory task, the scientists used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to identify brain regions in which changes suggesting memory impairment took place. Whereas some areas of the brain...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
25th September 2007
New research shows that proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy can help diagnose breast cancer with fewer false-positive results and invasive biopsies. Proton MR spectroscopy aided radiologists when used in conjunction with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), scientists at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Centre in New York City found. The study focused on non-mass enhancing breast lesions. Lead...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
25th September 2007
Dudwell St Mary joined forces with a local primary school to raise awareness of World Alzheimer's Day 2007 on Friday. The parents and children are encouraged to make a small donation of £1 in aid of the Hastings Alzheimer's Society. Children from Burwash Primary School were asked to create a 'Magical Memories Box' comprising three items for special days or occasions. The theme of the day was...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
24th September 2007
The first molecular urine test for diagnosing prostate cancer has been launched in London. Progensa PCA3 uses a genetic marker that is only increased in cancerous prostate tissue, making it a more specific indicator of cancer than other diagnostic markers such as PSA, thereby potentially reducing the number of unnecessary biopsies. Dr Chris Hiley: "The test has the potential to make a big...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
24th September 2007
New findings call into question the ability of vitamin E to reduce oxidative stress. A new study in Free Radical Biology and Medicine has found that the levels of vitamin E necessary to reduce oxidative stress are four to eight times higher than those used in almost all previous clinical trials. Co-author Dr Balz Frei said this meant all past research had been "fatally flawed". He continued: "A...
Care homes and elderly care from Barchester Healthcare
24th September 2007
The elderly are more prone to unintended racism, depression and problem gambling because of brain shrinkage over time, a new study has shown.University of Queensland psychologist Bill von Hippel has found that atrophy within the frontal lobes reduces our inhibitions as we grow older.The frontal lobes are responsible for executive functions, including planning, controlling, and inhibiting thoughts...

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