Parkinson's disease: TCE and PERC increase risk

Parkinson's disease: TCE and PERC increase risk

Trichloroethylene (TCE) and Perchloroethylene (PERC) increase the risk of developing Parkinson's disease, researchers claim. A study at the Parkinson's Institute discovered that the common chemicals heightened the chances of Parkinson's disease after investigating a cohort of twins, in which one had been exposed to TCE. It was also found that carbon tetrachloride (CC14) increased the risk of developing Parkinson's. Lead author Samuel Goldman stated: "Our findings, as well as prior case reports, suggest a lag time of up to 40 years between TCE exposure and onset of Parkinson's, providing a critical window of opportunity to potentially slow the disease process." Exposure to TCE can also increase a patient's chance of getting cancer and experiencing male infertility. Business and governments globally are increasingly implementing programmes to limit human contact with the chemical. Previously microorganisms have been used to remove TCE from water, which is often found in contaminated supplies and poses a serious health risk. Find the nearest Barchester care home