Older adults with OSA at risk of cardiovascular mortality

Older adults with OSA at risk of cardiovascular mortality

Older adults with untreated severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are at a greater risk of cardiovascular mortality. This is the finding of a recent study in Spain, which suggests treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) could be key to lowering the chance of death in OSA patients. Dr Miguel Ángel Martínez-García, lead author on the study, said: "Although the link between OSA and cardiovascular mortality is well established in younger patients, evidence on this relationship in the elderly has been conflicting." Researchers observed higher incidences of cardiovascular death in 939 patients with untreated OSA. Participants had an average age of 65 years or older, with a median follow-up of 69 months. Stroke and heart failure were the primary culprits, but outcomes were improved among those that had regular CPAP treatment. CPAP uses air pressure to keep airways open. A mask or device is fitted over the nose and a tube is connected to the motor of a CPAP machine. This blows air through the tube into the body. Find the nearest Barchester care home.