New drug holds cognitive benefits, researchers claim

New drug holds cognitive benefits, researchers claim

A new drug could hold cognitive benefits for patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease, according to researchers. In a study presented at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference, scientists claim that EVP-6124 could potentially improve cognition. During a phase two trial involving 409 people, it was found that participants who took the drug over a 23 week period experienced significant benefits in the range of measures for cognition, despite insignificant improvements in other activities. It is believed that EVP-6124 works by amplifying the effects of the chemical acetylcholine, which helps to create normal brain and memory function. A spokesperson from the Alzheimer’s Society commented: “Although the evidence suggests this drug could have moderate benefits for some of the symptoms of Alzheimer's there is little to suggest it is any better than existing treatments.” However, they added that a further development could be useful as an alternative to those intolerant to current medications. What’s more, it may be beneficial for patient’s that become unresponsive to certain drugs. Find out about dementia care and support services at Barchester care homes.