New antioxidants hold potential for Parkinson's treatment

New antioxidants hold potential for Parkinson's treatment

A new set of antioxidants are being heralded as a potential treatment for Parkinson's disease. Researchers claim that a class of powerful antioxidants known as synthetic triterpenoids successfully blocked the development of Parkinson's in an animal model. The study was conducted by Dr Bobby Thomas, neuroscientist at the Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Health Sciences University, and a team of researchers. They blocked the death of dopamine-producing brain cells that develop during Parkinson's using drugs to increase Nrf2. Nrf2 is a natural antioxidant and inflammation fighter, and lower levels are associated with cognitive decline. "This creates an environment in your brain that is not conducive for normal function," Dr Thomas said. "You can see the signs of oxidative damage in the brain long before the neurons actually degenerate in Parkinson's." Triterpenoids were found to be the most effective drugs to increase Nrf2, meaning that, in the future, scientists may be able to stop the disease in its tracks. The discovery may also hold benefits for other neurological conditions, and further research is needed. Find out about dementia care and support services at Barchester care homes.