Middle lane keeps older drivers safe

Middle lane keeps older drivers safe

The tendency of older adults to drive in the middle lane on motorways is a in-built safety mechanism, according to a recent study. Researchers at the University of Leeds found that older adults drive in the middle lane to adapt to reduced reaction times and motor skills. Rachel Raw, lead author of the study, commented:"Our results suggest that this compensation strategy is a general phenomenon and not just tied to driving. "It seems older people naturally adjust their movements to compensate for their reduced level of skill." Researchers made the discovery when investigating the difference between motor skills in the young and the over-60s. Participants were asked to use a touch-screen laptop to trace wiggly lines of varying widths at slow, quick and their own preferred speeds. Subjects were also asked to steer along winding roads when sitting in a driving simulator. Older adults were found to make allowances for their age by adopting a middle-of-the-road strategy in both tests. It is hoped that the work will be used to find new ways of helping patients recover lost motor skills after a stroke. Intensive exercise is thought to help patients improve motor skills and rehabilitation after a stroke by focusing on strength and balance. Find the nearest Barchester care home.