Metformin could slow prostate cancer

Metformin could slow prostate cancer

The growth rate of prostate cancer can be slowed by the use of metformin before prostatectomy, new research has indicated. A phase two study revealed the drug, which is commonly prescribed for diabetes, could help slow cancer growth if taken three times a day. Participants were given metformin for a median duration of 41 days, during which none reported serious adverse effects. Upon inspection, it was identified that metformin reduced fasting glucose, insulin growth factor-1, body mass index and waist-to-hip ration, in addition to slowing growth rate and one of the pathways that contribute to tumour augmentation. The findings indicate that metformin could be particularly beneficial for those patients that have both prostate cancer and diabetes. Dr Anthony Joshua, lead researcher on the study, stated: "This research builds on the hypothesis that metformin has a role in prostate cancer. "Exactly what that role will be will depend on the results of the analysis currently being completed by our study team and others worldwide." In the UK prostate cancer accounts for 24 per cent of all new male cancer diagnoses. Find the nearest Barchester care home.