Metal pollution linked to Parkinson's disease

Metal pollution linked to Parkinson's disease

A new scientific study suggests that metal pollution can contribute to a higher risk of developing Parkinson's disease. Researchers from the Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis believe that living near a steel factory or other source of high manganese emissions can increase the chances of developing the debilitating condition, according to Reuters. Information from more than five million Medicare beneficiaries was studied by the researchers, who compared Parkinson's development rates to levels of copper, lead and manganese in the air. Team leader Dr Brad Racette told the news provider that understanding the levels of toxins in communities could be key to reducing the incidence of Parkinson's disease. "If our findings are confirmed, our data would suggest that reducing industrial metal emissions may result in a substantial reduction in the number of new cases," he said. According to figures from Parkinson's UK, one in every 500 people in the UK is living with Parkinson's disease.

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