Mammograms increase chances of low risk tumours, experts claim

Mammograms increase chances of low risk tumours, experts claim

Older women who have cancers detected by mammograms have a good prognosis, a recent American study claims. While the chances of developing a lower-risk breast tumour increase with age, researchers at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) claim that survival chances are promising. The study is also the first to offer evidence at a molecular level of an increase in low or ultra-risk cancers in tumours when detected by screening mammography. Moreover, the findings provide a basis for integrating molecular profiling at the time of diagnosis. It is hoped that this will prevent overtreatment. Dr Laura Esserman, lead author of the study, stated: "A significant number of screen-detected tumours are very low risk. "It shows that we have an opportunity to improve care by using molecular predictors to recognise who has these ultra-low-risk or idle tumours, and safely minimise treatment." Much research has also been undertaken in recent years to discover a method of mammography that delivers the lowest levels of damage and side effects. It is believed that digital mammography emits far less radiation than conventional mammography, thus improving the safety of the treatment for patients. Find the nearest Barchester care home.