High caffeine levels linked to Alzheimer's avoidance

High caffeine levels linked to Alzheimer's avoidance

High levels of caffeine in the blood have been linked to a lower risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. Researchers from the University of South Florida and the University of Miami found that those who had a low caffeine intake experienced a much faster progression from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to Alzheimer's than those who took in more caffeine. "These intriguing results suggest that older adults with mild memory impairment who drink moderate levels of coffee - about 3 cups a day - will not convert to Alzheimer's disease - or at least will experience a substantial delay before converting to Alzheimer's," said study lead author Dr Chuanhai Cao, a neuroscientist at the USF College of Pharmacy. The study then revealed that 100 per cent of MCI patients with plasma caffeine levels above the critical point experienced no conversion to Alzheimer's in the two-to-four year follow ups. He said that these findings, in association with other studies, indicate that a consistant moderate daily intake of caffeine throughout adulthood can protect against Alzheimer's. Find out more about Alzheimer's disease care at Barchester homes