Gender determines heart attack risk

Gender determines heart attack risk

The chance of having a heart attack differs between men and women, according to a new study. Researchers at the Medical University of South Caroline used coronary CT angiography to assess arteries for blockages and showed different risk scenarios for different genders. By comparing the coronary CTA results of patients with outcome data over a 12.8-month follow-up period, scientists were able to correlate the extent, severity and type of plaque build-up with the occurrence of major adverse cardiac events. Dr John W Dance, researcher on the study, stated: "We found that the risks for cardiovascular events associated with plaque were significantly different between women and men." The results showed that women with a large amount of plaque build-up and extensive atherosclerosis are at significantly greater cardiovascular risk than men, specifically for major adverse cardiac events. However, the presence of individual types of plaque increases the risk for major adverse cardiac events among men more than women, when their artery segments contained non-calcified plaque. The success of different treatments has also been found to vary between the genders, with invasive treatments being beneficial for men but harmful for women. Find the nearest Barchester care home