Evidence builds in support of gene therapy for inherited blindness

Evidence builds in support of gene therapy for inherited blindness

Evidence for the use of gene therapy for treating inherited blindness has increased once again in support of the procedure, after three adult patients successfully had their vision improved through the therapy. The test cases had already had the procedure in one eye to great results and where given the same treatment in the other, allowing them to see in dim light and navigate obstacles in low-light situations. What’s more, no adverse effects were recorded, including immune reactions which are common in gene therapy. In this instance, gene therapy was used to target Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), a retinal disease that leads to blindness in adulthood. Study co-author Dr Jean Bennett commented: “Patients have told us how their lives have changed since receiving gene therapy. "They are able to walk around at night, go shopping for groceries and recognise people's faces - all things they couldn't do before.” The results follow in the wake of a discovery at the University of California, which could cure a common form of blindness using gene therapy that replacing a malfunctioning gene with a normal one. Find the nearest Barchester care home