Coronary stent death risk increased by depression

Coronary stent death risk increased by depression

Patients who have had a coronary stent implanted are at a greater risk of death if they are depressed, according to a recent study. In a paper presented at the 12th Annual Spring Meeting on Cardiovascular Nursing, it was revealed that depressed patients are 1.5 times more likely to die following the procedure than those who are free from mental health complications. The link between mortality and depression following a coronary stent implant was found to be independent of age, gender, clinical characteristics and personality. Researchers investigated the outcomes of 1,234 percutaneous coronary intervention patients over a period of seven years after having a coronary stent implant. Some 324 patients monitored had depression at the beginning of the study and after seven years 15.2 per cent had died. Nikki Damon, lead author on the study and PhD candidate, stated: "Doctors and nurses have traditionally focussed on medical factors like diabetes or family history of cardiovascular disease when assessing PCI patients' risk of death, but that's not the whole picture." The study indicated that more needs to be done to address mental health needs following major surgery to reduce the risk of mortality. Read about support and personalised care at Barchester care homes for anyone with mental health concerns.